Scilla Scilla Siberica Bulbs

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Product code:
3663602064503

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Scilla Scilla Siberica Bulbs

Product code:
3663602064503
Scilla Scilla Siberica Bulbs Scilla Scilla Siberica Bulbs

Current price

£1.00 was  £2.00

you save  £1.00

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Product Details

Product Information

  • Pack quantity - 10
  • These bulbs are grown from cultivated stock. Our bulbs are guaranteed to flower in their first season
  • Planting Season: August-December. March-April
  • Genus - Scilla siberica

Features and Benefits

  • Scilla Siberica is one of the earliest spring bloomers, producing intense blue, bell-shaped nodding flowers
  • Where to plant - Partial shade
  • Water well during dry spells and top dress with a general purpose plant food as the last flowers fades. Allow foliage to die down naturally. Flowering results should improve each year
  • RHS Award of Garden Merit

Technical Specifications

Technical specification of Scilla Scilla Siberica Bulbs
Colour description Blue
Soil type Clay, loam, or sand
Soil pH pH 5-7
Weight (g) 55g
Rate of growth Average
Eventual height & spread 10x8 cm
Watering needs In dry spells only
Hardiness Full hardy
Storage details Keep in a cool and dry place
Fragrance Unscented

Help & Advice

How to guides

How to plant spring-flowering bulbs in autumn

How to plant spring-flowering bulbs in autumn

When autumn’s chill replaces summer’s sun, it can be all too easy to head indoors and forget about your garden. But just a little effort at this time of year can reward you with gorgeous bright colours as early as January thanks to spring flowering bulbs. Bulbs are one of our favourite things to plant, they’re ideal for beginner gardeners, easy to look after, and will quickly fill your garden with colour.

Bulbs planted in wooden container

For a riot of colour in the early months of the year, you should look to plant your bulbs between September and November.

Between September and November, the ground is still warm from summer and the extreme frosts of winter have yet to strike.

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Bulbs explained

‘Bulb’ is a general term given to a variety of plants that have an underground storage organ for nutrients. This can include bulbs, corms, tubers or rhizomes. The ones most commonly planted in autumn for spring blooming are:

  • Bulbs – These are condensed, rounded, stems or leaves that create a storage organ for the plant.
  • Corms – Similar to bulbs, but smaller.
  • Rhizomes – Like bulbs and corms, rhizomes are actually stems rather than roots, but are usually elongated and found just beneath the surface of the soil.

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Bulbs to plant in autumn

Use our table below for a quick guide to some of this bulbs you can plant in autumn.


Caption describing table
Bulb/Tuber/Corm Depth Distance between
Allium 10cm 10cm
Bluebell 10cm 10cm
Crocus 10cm 7cm
Daffodil 10cm 7cm
Hyacinth 10cm 8cm
Iris Reticulata 10cm 8cm
Lily 20cm 15cm
Tree Lily 20cm 15cm
Tulip 15cm 13cm

How to choose a planting location

orange rose

Most bulbs will thrive in almost any setting, including rock gardens, hanging baskets, borders and beds; if they have water and sunlight. As long as you plant them in a nice sunny site with good drainaige, you should see success.

However, to get the best out of them you may still want to consider where to plant them.

Soil type

Different plants thrive in different conditions, so there’s no exact set of rules for where to plant your bulbs. Daffodils, snowdrops and bluebells do well in heavy clay soil and will flower in early spring. Crocuses and tulips can do well in free draining, sandy soil.

Shade or sun?

There are bulbs for all corners of the garden. Bluebells, snowdrops and snake head fritillaries thrive in shady areas. Remember to dig in plenty of compost before planting if your soil is dry as this will help retain water. If you have a bright sunny spot, try planting alliums, tulips and daffodils.

Beds and borders

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Bulbs bear colourful flowers that can be perfect for filling space in beds and borders. You can be as creative as you like with the varieties available in a huge range of colours. Scatter them amongst your existing plants, or plan out a formal planting scheme using selected colours and varieties. As a rule, it’s best to plant bulbs at least 10cm away from each other if they’re not being planted in a container.

Lawns

Smaller flowers such as crocuses or dwarf narcissus can blend in wonderfully with a lawn and bring a wild, natural look to your garden. Avoid placing larger flowers such as tulips here as they can look a little top heavy and out of place. A good tip for the natural look is to start by scattering a handful of bulbs gently across your lawn, then plant them where they fall. Consider using a bulb planter for planting in grass, as it’s far easier than digging with a fork or trowel. If you want the flowers to return next year don’t mow the lawn until at least six weeks after the flowers die.

Baskets and containers

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Many bulbs do very well in containers, where they can be guaranteed good moisture and rich soil. It’s always best to add ‘crocks’ (broken pieces of pots or ceramics) to the bottom of the pot to help with drainage and prevent water-logging.

Individual bulbs will flower from a few days through to several weeks, and by layering up one container with several different types of bulbs, you can be sure to get two to three months of vibrant colour.

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How to plant bulbs

You'll need:

planting bulbs with trowell

Spring-flowering bulbs are planted whilst dormant in autumn. With most bulbs, it’s a simple as digging a small hole, dropping in the bulb, and covering with soil/compost. .

However, there may be a few with different requirements and preferences such as planting depth; so always check exactly what you’re planting and follow any particular guidance relating to that species.

Step 1

Dig down into soil to the required depth using the trowel, and make a hole wide enough to easily drop the bulb into. Bulbs and corms should be planted in a hole at least three times the depth of the bulb.

Step 2

Add a small handful of horticultural sand or grit into the planting hole to improve drainage and air circulation around the bulb.

Step 3

Place the bulb in the hole, with any pointed end or buds facing upwards.

Step 4

Fill the hole over with soil, breaking up any large clods as you go, then firm it down gently.

Top Tip

If planting in beds and borders, you may want to mark where you’ve planted to prevent you digging up the bulbs before they have emerged.

How to layer bulbs in containers

In addition to the aforementioned equipment, you may need: - Pots and planters - Compost (this will help add structure and drainage to the soil)

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Step 1

Choose at least three varieties of bulb with different flowering times.

Step 2

Fill a container with compost until there is about 25cm depth left of the pot. The container can be any size, though best to be at least 30cm tall to allow enough space for each layer.

Step 3

Place the latest and tallest flowering bulbs on the compost (quite tightly, but not so the bulbs are touching each other).

Step 4

Cover the bulbs with a few centimetres of compost.

Step 5

Add a layer of the second latest flowering bulbs.

Step 6

Cover the bulbs with a few centimetres of compost.

Step 7

Add the first flowering variety and cover them with three to five centimetres of compost.

Step 8

Give the planted bulbs a good watering.

Top Tip

Bulbs planted in pots may need some frost protection over the winter if it’s very cold. Position your pots somewhere sheltered and away from frost pockets. House in a shed overnight if you know it’s going to be very extremely cold – just don’t forget to take them out again.

How to care for bulbs

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When planted in a bed, border or lawn, most spring bulbs will survive without extra water. Many bulb plants come from warmer climates than ours, and so will only need watering in especially dry conditions. If they’re being grown in pots a good soaking once or twice a week will suffice if the soil has dried out. If the weather is very wet, move your plants to a sheltered area.

Feeding

These plants collect and store nutrients in their bulbs through their foliage, so it’s not usually necessary to feed them. However, to give them the best start, it’s worth digging in some compost and a little plant food (such as bone meal or Growmore) into the soil when planting.

Storage

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When planted in a bed, border or lawn, most spring bulbs will survive without extra water. Many bulb plants come from warmer climates than ours, and so will only need watering in especially dry conditions. If they’re being grown in pots a good soaking once or twice a week will suffice if the soil has dried out. If the weather is very wet, move your plants to a sheltered area.

Looking out for garden pests

We aren’t the only ones charmed by the brightly coloured flowers from bulbs. Many of our visiting garden animals and insects do too. There are a few pests and diseases which can cause problems which you should look out for:

Birds

Birds can quite easily be kept away, either by surrounding your flowers with short, twiggy branches or making your own bird scarers out of old CDs.

Lily Beetles

As the name suggests, these are a problem that’s mostly limited to lilies, although they can sometimes go for other flowering plants as well. The beetles lay their eggs at the bottom of leaves, so that the larvae can eat them once they hatch. Keep an eye out for them and pull them off the plants if you see any.

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Squirrels and mice

These and other small rodents will often dig up newly planted bulbs as a tasty treat.

To prevent this you can protect your flower beds with chicken wire or a sprinkling of holly leaves, or you may want to consider adding some sharp gravel to the top and sides of your bulb planting holes.

Vine Weevils

Vine weevils and grubs can cause damage to plants and flowers, often going for bulbs. Grey-brown in colour with a pointed snout, the adults can be found eating curved notches out of leaves, while their grubs live in the soil and feed on roots, bulbs. These are best kept under control a pest control product.

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