See more Petrol Lawnmowers

Home

Right chevron

Outdoor & Garden

Right chevron

Garden Power Tools

Right chevron

Lawnmowers

Right chevron

Petrol Lawnmowers

Right chevron
icon.title_zoominzoom outZoom reset
Webb R21HW Petrol Lawnmower

Webb R21HW Petrol Lawnmower

£394
Loading
Checking availability...
Loading
Checking availability...

Product details

Product information

This Webb R21HW self-propelled petrol lawnmower is ideal for cutting grass and keeping your lawn neat and tidy (300 m²).

  • For cutting grass and keeping your lawn neat and tidy
  • Collection capacity (L) - 70L
  • Comes with Mulch plug and side ejection grass chute
  • Cutting width - 530mm
  • Blade type - Rotary

Features and benefits

Mulch plug & side ejection grass chute

  • Rear/side discharge / mulch
  • easi view grass colector
  • Large wheels
  • Single lever height adjuster
  • Ball bearing wheels

Specifications

Manufacturer guarantee2 years
Blade typeRotary
Collection capacity70L
Cutting width530mm
Engine manufacturerBriggs & Stratton
Engine model675 E
Fuel typePetrol
Fuel tank capacity1L
Model name/numberR21HW
Product height1150mm
Product length1720mm
Product weight38.5kg
Product width560mm
Propulsion typeSelf-propelled
Start facilityRecoil start
Product code5060012807450

Reviews

Full star
Full star
Full star
Full star
Empty star
4 / 5(1 reviews)

Great mower, but can be difficult to start.

Full star
Full star
Full star
Full star
Empty star

hotchillipizza - 4 years ago

The Briggs & Stratton 675e Readystart engine, which guarantees the mover to start on the second attempt is a load of rubbish! As the engine had no ability to prime (meant to be self-priming) , the engine can sometimes take 15-20 pulls of the cord to start! Once running it’s fine, but that many attempts to start a brand new mower is certainly excessive!
My 20 year old mower which I just got rid of, had a traditional Briggs & Stratton engine with a manual prime, this would always start by the 3rd or 4th pull without fail.

Overall the mower is excellent, but the removal of the prime bulb from the “modern” Briggs & Stratton engine is just a tiresome inconvenience and a failed attempt to improve something that didn’t need improving.